Amplify review September 2022.

Amplify review September 2022.

Fresh and vital” - Tom Robinson

— BBC Radio 6 mixtape.

SICKY has a new album due shortly and there’s a couple of tasters doing the rounds. The Bridge comes with a video that has it soundtracking Uma Thurman and John Travolta’s dance from Pulp Fiction, the track an upbeat chugging slice of catchy 70s pop with a percolating keyboard riff that recalls Doug Sahm and The Texas Tornados while, after a whirligig intro, Swim Shallow (Kitchen Dance Part Deux) rides a glam stomp swaggery handclap rhythm with a shadowy seam of menace to the breathy vocals and urgency. On this form, it could be his best and most commercial album yet.” - Mike Davies

Brum Beat

SICKY has been busy doing the lockdown, next month seeing yet another new album, Bowling Balls, one that inclines to his more commercial melodic pop sensibilities. Opening with a sample from the Apollo 8 Christmas message, ‘Same Thing In Reverse’ is a catchy staccato acoustic strum complete with whistling, followed by the all join in infectious ‘we love ya’ chorus of the glam-tinged ‘Back In The Room’ and a prowling rhythm groove ‘The Last Hello’ with paranoid guitar licks that perhaps hint at some Prince influences. The ebb and flow title track, at just under two minutes, nods to 60s psychedelia, the acoustic ‘Birthday Song’ is firmly of a country folk persuasion, sounding at times like a slowed down ‘Tom Dooley’, while ‘Safe On Earth?’ with its falsetto notes rolls out a budget orchestral feel. The Bowie strum styled ‘I’d Die’ begins the countdown, followed by the 60 second growly spoken ‘Problem’, rounding out with, first the yearning mid-tempo strut, acoustic guitar chugging and percussion clank slowly gathering Greenwich Village folk-blues anthemic balladeering of ‘Water’ that proves a particular standout, and finally, keyboards swirling, ‘Three Lovers’ with its chirping backdrop vocals pulse, swelling to a cathartic finale and close. It’s essentially a simple affair in terms of arrangements, but I reckon it’s the best thing he’s done in years and, were it not for the nature of the industry and getting the exposure it deserves, would be the one to really put him on the map.” - Mike Davies
Right, it can’t just be me who hears this bassline and gets the Blues Brothers subliminal tune, The Peter Gunn Theme by Peter Howard? Much like the film this song features a shades-wearing multi-talented beast-man. That man is Sicky aka Mick Butler from Wolverhampton. Uber talented multi-instrumentalist who weaves and twists dark synth sounds with phatt (yep I went there) basslines and quirky vocals and smart lyrics. He compares himself to Goldfrapp meets Nine Inch Nails and if this track is anything to go by, the album will be a fabulous love child.” - Chris Ingram

— Fresh on the Net

SICKY – You Give Me Love – Groovy. In a word. Psychedelic. In two. Funky. In three. This track shifts so well, it hurts not to move to it. Smart use of sonic-space to create an uber-cool, stripped-down production that bursts into instrumentation and breaks down back to sparse arrangement. Love the robot voice (I’m a sucker for a robot voice). It’s just too damn cool for school! Roll on next week!” - Tobi

— Fresh on the Net

SICKY B – Gotta Let Go – Short. Fast. Loud. An overdriven drag racer fed through a Peavey and set to explode. Riffs crash and burn in distortion spanked fizz and noise. Bass driving and grinding the track in ever-gear-shifting acceleration. Love the crisp shuffle on the snare – but oh for some tasty low punch on the kick to really smash the track into the dirt. Vocals swoop and soar in protracted grooves and melodic shimmers. Rushing and hustling the guitars with uber-cool understated attitude. “Gotta Let Go” is shades and a mustang. Sunsets and cooked asphalt. Obnoxious and unrefined. Rock. 100% pure, undiluted rock. Step on the loud pedal and turn it up, kiddies! Roll on next week! ” - Tobi (Fresh on the net)